Childhood Disability Benefits (CDB)

Adults who have a disability that began before they turned 22 can get other benefits through Social Security called Childhood Disability Benefits (CDB). These benefits are based on the taxes their parents paid into the Social Security system. Unlike SSDI benefits, you do not need to have worked to qualify for CDB.

To be eligible for CDB, one of your parents must:

You can also get CDB if you had a disability before turning 18 and you were getting benefits based on your parent’s Social Security earnings record. These benefits are discussed in DB101’s Benefits for Young People article.

The Social Security Administration (SSA) uses the same disability determination criteria for CDB that it uses for SSI and SSDI benefits. If Social Security decides that you cannot work and earn above the Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) level and that your disabling condition meets Social Security’s medical definition of disability, you can qualify for CDB.

For more information on CDB and other benefits that young people with disabilities can qualify for, read DB101’s Benefits for Young People article and take a look at SSA’s publication on Benefits for Children with Disabilities.

CDB and Medicare

If you get CDB, you can also get health coverage through Medicare after a 24-month waiting period. To learn more, talk to a benefits planner.