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1619(b)

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A rule that lets people who stop getting Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits due to work income keep their Medicaid health coverage while earning up to $40,190 per year. 1619(b) also makes it easier to get SSI benefits started up again if your countable income goes below SSI's income limit. For 1619(b), you must continue to meet other SSI eligibility rules, such as the resource limit.

Note: If your earnings are over this limit and you have high medical expenses, you might still qualify for 1619(b). Ask your local Social Security office about the 1619(b) Individualized Earnings Threshold.

Benefits Planner

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A trained expert who can help you understand different public benefit programs, such as those offered by the Social Security Administration (SSA) and by the state of Ohio. A benefits planner can help you avoid complications when you are working on a job plan for your future.

The offices you should contact to find a benefits planner depend on your situation and the benefits you get.

SSI and SSDI

To understand how work affects SSI and SSDI, contact:

Medicaid or MBIWD

Medicare

Work Preparation

Other Benefits

Childhood Disability Benefits (CDB)

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Social Security benefits for adults who:
  • Became disabled before turning 22, and
  • Have a parent who died or who gets retirement or SSDI benefits.

Formerly known as "Disabled Adult Child" (DAC) benefits.

Disability Financial Assistance (DFA)

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Disability Financial Assistance was a program that paid a small monthly benefit to low-income people with disabilities who do not get SSI. This benefit helped until Social Security decided on an SSI application and ended when a person started getting SSI benefits.

The program was phased out in 2017 and no longer offers benefits.

Food Assistance

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A program that helps people with low income and limited resources pay for food. Food Assistance gives you a plastic card, called an Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) card, that looks and works like a debit card, except that it can only be used to buy food. Food Assistance puts money on the EBT card each month. Food Assistance used to be called Food Stamps and you may also hear it called by its federal name, SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program).

To apply for Food Assistance:

Using the combined application form, you can also apply for Medicaid and Ohio Works First (OWF) at the same time.

Note: If you and everybody else in your household receive either Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Ohio Works First (OWF) benefits, you automatically qualify for Food Assistance.

View the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services Food Assistance fact sheet.

Healthy Start

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Healthy Start is a Medicaid program for qualifying Ohio residents who are 18 years old or younger and who have limited family income.

Low- or No-Cost Medicaid

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Medicaid coverage that is free or has very low expenses for the beneficiary. Many people, including children, adults, and seniors with and without disabilities may qualify for low- or no-cost Medicaid if they have low income.

To apply for Medicaid, contact your County Department of Job and Family Services (CDJFS) office.

Medicaid

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A state-run health care program that pays medical expenses for people who are disabled, young, elderly, or poor. If you meet program requirements, Medicaid will help pay for a variety of medical services including visits to the doctor, hospital stays, medical equipment, home care services, and prescription drugs.

To apply for Medicaid, visit your County Department of Job and Family Services (CDJFS) office.

Medicaid Buy-In for Workers with Disabilities (MBIWD)

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A program that offers health coverage to working people with disabilities in Ohio who have too much income or resources to qualify for standard Medicaid. To get MBIWD coverage, you may have to pay a monthly premium.

To apply for MBIWD, contact your local County Department of Job and Family Services (CDJFS) office.

Medicare Premium Assistance Program (MPAP)

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A program that helps people with low income and low resources pay for their Medicare expenses, such as Medicare Part A and B premiums, coinsurance, and deductibles. There are four Medicare Premium Assistance Programs:
  • The Qualified Medicare Beneficiary (QMB) program helps people with countable income at or below 100% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines (FPG) ($1,041 per month if you live alone). QMB helps pay for your Part B premium, copayments, and deductibles.
  • The Specified Low-Income Beneficiary (SLMB) program helps people with countable income that’s more than 100% of FPG, but at or below 120% of FPG ($1,249 per month if you live alone). SLMB helps pay for the Part B premium but does not help with anything else.
  • The Qualified Individual-1 (QI-1) program helps people with countable income that’s more than 120% of FPG, but at or below 135% of FPG ($1,405 per month if you live alone). QI-1 helps pay for the Part B premium but does not help with anything else.
  • The Qualified Disabled Working Individual (QDWI) helps people who have lost their SSDI benefits because they earn more than the substantial gainful activity (SGA) level ($1,220 per month), but have countable income at or below 200% of FPG ($2,082 per month if you live alone). It lets you stay on Medicare Part A even though you don’t get SSDI anymore and it will pay for the Part A premium that would otherwise apply.

You can apply for any of these by filling out the MPAP ODM Form 07216 and submitting it to your local County Department of Job and Family Services (CDJFS) office.

Medicare Supplement

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A supplemental insurance policy sold by private insurance companies to fill gaps in the Original Medicare Plan. In Ohio, there are 10 Medicare supplement plans labeled Plan A through Plan N.

Medicare supplement plans are available only to individuals using the Original Medicare Plan, and it is illegal for an insurance carrier to sell a Medicare supplement to an individual who does not have Original Medicare.

Medicare supplements are also referred to as "MedSup" plans, or "Medigap."

Ohio Works First (OWF)

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A program that gives cash assistance to families with children that have low income and limited resources. Ohio Works First (OWF) is sometimes called Welfare-to-Work and you may also hear it called by its federal name, TANF (Temporary Assistance to Needy Families).

To apply for Ohio Works First (OWF):

Using the combined application form, you can also apply for Medicaid and Food Assistance at the same time.

View the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services Ohio Works First (OWF) fact sheet.

PASS Cadre

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A group of specialists at the Social Security Administration (SSA) who review, monitor, and approve Plans to Achieve Self-Support (PASS). They can also help you as you write your plan.

To contact the Ravenna PASS Cadre (serving Northern Ohio), call 1-855-863-3565, ext. 33816. To contact the Worthington PASS Cadre (serving Southern Ohio), call 1-866-789-0957, ext. 216.

Reporting Agencies

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Agencies to which you need to report any changes in your income or living situation, if you get public benefits.

If you're on Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), call Social Security at 1-800-772-1213 or 1-800-325-0778 (TTY), or visit your local Social Security office, and ask what's the best way for you to report. Note: Reporting rules for SSI and SSDI are different and if you get both benefits, you must report income for them separately.

If you're on Medicaid or any other state program, like Ohio Works First (OWF) or Food Assistance, report online or contact your local County Department of Job and Family Services (CDJFS) office.

Residential State Supplement (RSS) Program

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A program that helps adults who get Supplemental Security Income (SSI) , Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), or Social Security retirement benefits pay for their room, board, and services in approved community settings, so that they don’t have to live in nursing homes or institutions. Approved settings may include Adult Care Facilities, Adult Foster Homes, or Residential Care/Assisted Living Facilities.

Learn more about the RSS program.

Resource Limit

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The maximum amount of resources you're allowed to own while maintaining eligibility for a particular disability benefits program. Most benefits programs do not count everything you own, including the home you live in and one car you own. For Supplemental Security Income (SSI), the first $100,000 in an ABLE account is not counted as resources. For Medicaid, Food Assistance, and some other programs, none of the money in an ABLE account is counted.

Also called an "asset limit."

Resources

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Cash or property that you own, can convert to cash, or can use to support yourself. Stocks, bonds, and savings accounts are a few examples of resources. The home you live in and the car you drive to work are exempt under most Social Security and state disability benefit programs. For Supplemental Security Income (SSI), the first $100,000 in an ABLE account is not counted as resources. For Medicaid, Food Assistance, and some other programs, none of the money in an ABLE account is counted.

Also called "assets."

Supplemental Security Income (SSI)

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A Social Security Administration program that gives cash benefits to people with disabilities who have limited income and resources. The amount you get in SSI benefits is based on your financial need and your living situation. The maximum monthly SSI benefit is $771 for individuals and $1,157 for eligible couples.