If you have a disability, are blind, or are over age 65 and you also have low income and limited resources, you may qualify for Supplemental Security Income (SSI), a program run by the Social Security Administration (SSA).

If you qualify for SSI, you get monthly cash payments to help you pay for your basic needs. A person who is single can get up to $735 per month in benefits. You also get Medicaid health coverage automatically, without having to file a separate application.

If you apply for SSI, you should also apply for Disability Financial Assistance (DFA), which may help you out while Social Security reviews your SSI application.

Don't get SSI mixed up with other programs

Social Security has two disability benefits programs with very similar names:

  • Supplemental Security Income (SSI) gives cash benefits to people with disabilities who have low income and low resources. You do not need to have worked in the past to get SSI. SSI is explained in this article.
  • Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) gives cash benefits to people with disabilities who qualify because they used to work or have a parent who worked. Learn more in DB101’s SSDI article.

Some people qualify for both programs at the same time. If you get benefits from Social Security, but aren’t sure which ones you get, order a free Benefits Planning Query (BPQY) at your local Social Security office or by calling 1-800-772-1213 or 1-800-325-0778 (TTY).

Get Expert Help

If you have questions about SSI and need to talk with somebody, call Social Security at 1-800-772-1213 or 1-800-325-0778 (TTY) or visit your local Social Security office.

If you want to ask about how work might affect your SSI benefits, try contacting: